Bison success, a new mindset, and climate success

Bison: they’re here. They weren’t going to be, but they are!Bison restoration represents a great conservation success story, and it should inspire us as we battle to transform our greenhouse gas making ways. Bison—the big mammal that filled North America prairies and forests in the millions—were within a whisper of extinction, but then they wereContinue reading “Bison success, a new mindset, and climate success”

Medora, North Dakota: What a fun surprise.

My wife and I had come to Medora, North Dakota to explore the Theodore Roosevelt National Park, to see the Badlands and its animals and plants, and to see where TR attained solace after family tragedy, and where he established and then failed at two ranches. Those places and things  we saw, and we hadContinue reading “Medora, North Dakota: What a fun surprise.”

Wonderful, accessible Oregon coast

Oregon state, with its many and long sandy and rocky beaches, makes its coastline accessible to the public, unlike in my home state of Washington, where people can own the shoreline, so no-trespassing signs litter the beach (that said, there is much pretty to see in Washington). But in Oregon, as my wife and IContinue reading “Wonderful, accessible Oregon coast”

Nothing I Have to Do Today

Travel Journal, 2021-05-23: Wallowa Lake State Park, Joseph, OR. Situation: Sitting on the grass at Wallowa Lake, my back resting on a log, and me hearing the ripples of the Wallowa River to my right. No one else around. Here I can snooze, look, think, and write. Nature rolls on at the lake year afterContinue reading “Nothing I Have to Do Today”

Layers of Time Lived Through Travel and History: Nez Perce, Naples, and Okinawa

Travel Journal, 2021-05-19, Lewiston, ID My wife and I recently toured the Nez Perce Reservation, east of Lewiston, Idaho. Here, members of Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery passed through in 1805, Nez Perce Indians (they call themselves Nimiipuu) have lived for thousands of years, and mammoths once foraged, more than 10,000 years ago.

Palouse Falls, WA

Travel Journal: Palouse Falls, WA, 2021-05-13. A massive flood created Palouse Falls in western Washington State when a half-mile high dam of ice holding back glacial Lake Missoula broke (and it broke many times) more than 13,000 years ago. The flood(s) sent billions of tons of water raging across western Washington. Now the Palouse RiverContinue reading “Palouse Falls, WA”

Off the Grid and in the Stars

(2021-05-13 Travel Journal: Tucannon River RV Park, near Palouse Falls, WA.) When you read this, Judy and I will have rejoined the internet-connected world, but as I type this on my computer, no web or phone signals arrive or leave our campsite in the Palouse hills of western Washington. However, we’re overlain by a skyContinue reading “Off the Grid and in the Stars”